Bigindicator

20140710102120-henrik_vibskov___vibskovski_72___ruttkowski_68_5
The Multifarious Henrik Vibskov
by ArtSlant STREET
Henrik Vibskov at Ruttkowski 68
20140702171126-punk_memories__escape_9__by_john_bagnall__c__john_bagnall
Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK
by Charlotte Jansen
The British Library
20140702062816-image
TACO TRICYCLE TIMBUKTU
by Charlotte Jansen
John Atherton, Hin, BOB MOTOWN at Stour Space
20140627175109-bigpicture
Larry Clark Photograph Sale
by Charlotte Jansen
Larry Clark at Simon Lee
20140630212648-cropforstreetimg_6106
ROA's Projectum 06 Installation at Stolenspace Gallery
by Laura Havlin
ROA at StolenSpace Gallery
20140529230637-cross_bow_hunter_by_hydeon_2014
Ian 'Hydeon' Ferguson's Herms at Maxwell Colette Gallery
by ArtSlant STREET
Ian 'Hydeon' Ferguson at Maxwell Colette Gallery

20140710102120-henrik_vibskov___vibskovski_72___ruttkowski_68_5
by ArtSlant STREET

Henrik Vibskov at Ruttkowski 68
Köln - Henrik Vibskov has a lot going on. Between playing drums for Trentemøller, designing avant-garde fashion for his own eponymous fashion label, and doing costume and set design for clients ranging from the ballet to Björk, Vibskov makes art. True to his multifarious creative output, his visual art leans in many different directions, from photographs to prints, to textiles, woodcuts and objects. Aesthetically these objects seem bound by their shared explorations of line and color, simultaneously sketch-like and refined. As the gallery mentions, "art remains Vibskov's raison d'être - the purest expression of his ideas," and that's clearly true. You can see his wide ranging solo show at Ruttkowski 68 in Cologne, Germany, until July 20th. Henrik Vibskov, 'Moon nuts', 2014; Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68 More on Henrik Vibskov: The name Henrik Vibskov is most commonly associated not only with a fashion label, but a multitude of twisted yet tantalising universes created in relation to each collection. “The Transparent Tongue“, “The Spaghetti Handjob“ and “The Shrink Wrap Spectacular“ are just a few titles of shows Henrik Vibskov has produced lately, each title referring to a different but equally mesmerising world and set of logic. As a fashion designer Henrik Vibskov has produced over 25 mens (and later also women’s) collections since he graduated from Central St. Martins in 2001, and as a member of the Chambre Syndicale de la Mode Masculine he is currently the only Scandinavian designer on the official show schedule of the Paris Mens Fashion Week, which he has been since January 2003. (text source: Artist's Website) Henrik Vibskov, Installation views; Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68 Henrik Vibskov, Thomas Jessen, 'Fragile Soap Bodies', 2013; Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68 For further information...(ArtSlant Profile) (Artist's Website) (Gallery) (Image on top: Henrik Vibskov, Installation view; Courtesy of the Artist and Ruttkowski 68) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140709175126-sen2
by Eva Recinos

Sen2 at 1AM Gallery
San Francisco - Neighborhoods might be imaginary divisions based on street names, but they hold a real effect over our lives. If we stay in one neighborhood during our entire childhood, it ultimately shapes our world views. If we travel to a new one, we might come back with a shifted perspective. Out of all art forms, graffiti and street art especially emphasize place and space. For graffiti writers tagging trains in New York in the 1980s, the rush was knowing other neighborhoods would see your tag. You didn’t have to travel because your tag did. And you would be proud to be a part of the New York scene. Today, artists everywhere from Los Angeles to São Paulo can collaborate with each other and see each other's work in person and online. It's a moment that speaks to the growing cross-pollination of street art. Growing up in Puerto Rico, Sen2 found his artistic voice by connecting with local artists but also by traveling. After a visit to New York in the 1980s — an important time and place in the history of graffiti — he returned with a serious passion for the art form. Over time, Sen2 gained notoriety; he joined Tats Cru in New York and began working with celebrities like Nas and Missy Elliot. In his current solo show, "A Declaration of Color," this trajectory comes together. The show pays homage to New York graffiti while displaying the colorful twist Sen2 puts on the style. Cutlures collide in the artist’s dynamically composed pieces. "Estados Unidos" shows the Statue of Liberty looking regal while a print called "South Bronx" portrays a tagged train with the American flag in the background. Many of his pieces use titles written in Spanish like "Miradas" – a lively mixed-media portrait of an anonymous woman. The strength of Sen2's artistry shines the most in these mixed media pieces. The artist hides little visual clues everywhere on the canvas — illegible writing in thin cursive, splatters of spray paint that almost fade into the background, crisp geometric shapes that appear where you least expect them. Despite being on canvas, many of the works hold onto the unique tactile qualities of spray paint. In some pieces, spray paint drips in streaks across the entire composition and pools at the bottom in small globs. It's as if the canvases were freshly painted. Though the black-and-white prints are a beautifully nostalgic nod to the budding New York graffiti scene, the pieces with color ultimately make a more lasting impression. Faithful to the show’s title, Sen2 boldly declares that no edge of the canvas should remain untouched. He crafts pieces with layer upon layer of color. The juxtaposition of so many bright colors in the same intensity on one canvas sounds overwhelming, but in person, it’s hard to look away. Outside of the gallery, the artist created a mural with his tag. The spray paint spills out onto a bit of the sidewalk, almost as if it's a mirror image of the mural's bright colors. Sen2 commented that onlookers gladly kept him company and shared the history of the buildings nearby. For this particular neighborhood — one with its own colorful characters — Sen2 brought something to brighten up that corner. And perhaps a bit of San Francisco will leave with Sen2. —Eva Recinos (All images: Sen2; Courtesy of The Artist and 1AM Gallery) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140702171126-punk_memories__escape_9__by_john_bagnall__c__john_bagnall
by Charlotte Jansen

The British Library
London - High hopes for this seductively titled show: a subject that is rarely examined in depth in a museum context, with all the resources at their disposition. Added to this was the idea of discovering some of the British Library’s comprehensive archive at the UK’s biggest ever exhibition of comics. This was going to be fun. The thing that this show does well is to highlight how key the role of comics has been in propagating political change. Presenting comics from the late Victorian era onwards, the exhibition successfully demonstrates the function of comics in Britain as a fundamental vehicle for political expression: for the emancipation of women and homosexuals, for freedom of speech for subcultures and extreme groups. Being an editor of such publications was a risky business – something that is hard to appreciate now - and publishing houses were in a constant battle with the State over what could and should be published. Yet they persisted, and their influence, particularly on the nation’s youth, was feared – they were even held accountable for the spreading of ‘evil’ ideas and immoral behavior. Jack the Ripper's victims, Illustrated Police News, 1888; © British Library Board But in looking at the socio-political impact, this show miserably overlooks another important purpose comics have: to entertain. Their visual appeal, their artistic element, and their humor makes up the power of comics – added to the enjoyment to be had in thumbing through their pages – and this just doesn’t come through in this presentation. The problem is that all of the comics on display here are wearily enshrined in vitrines, so that they are already only presented as a synecdoche that is never experienced as its whole – you can glimpse a page of Oz, a cover of Heroine. The Robert Crumb exhibition two years ago at the Palais de Tokyo faced a similar problem which Crumb himself spoke of, but it was maneuvered with aplomb, displaying entire comics, albeit still protected in frames or cases - but at least visitors could look at – read, actually - the whole comic, not just get a vague idea from a fragment. Surely the excitement of comics and their irreverent spirit is lost in this kind of conventional museum setting, and therefore this show is deeply disappointing for any fan of paper publications. Moreover, the works themselves seem to have been selected according to their historical merit rather than their aesthetic allure, which seems to also be quite an archaic, rather than anarchic, approach. It would have been great to see more of those scintillating artists such as Aubrey Beardsley, seen fleetingly, on display. The vibrant colors, the delicacy of the print making, are all lost under the institutional boxes, and as the show rambles on, you begin to wilt, rather than imbibe all that supposedly gung-ho energy. The point of comics is that they were able to stir chaos firstly because of their format - their message was almost secondary, or else they would just be newspapers, or pamphlets, or books. Heroine, 1978; © Suzi Varty It looks as if the BL have spent all the money on splashing lots of hi-tech looking props and lighting – particularly jarring were the randomly placed Anonymous mannequins whose direct connection to comic books is never revealed – all which came across as an attempt at reinserting the fun that has been robbed from the comics themselves. In all, the show provides a pedagogical overview of the ‘anarchy’ of comics, rather than making a selection that unmasks their ‘art’. —Charlotte Jansen (Image on top: John Bagnall, Punk Memories, Escape 9; © John Bagnall) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140707180807-image
by Kimberly B. Johnson

Los Angeles - The latest conversations between Steven Daily and myself left the overwhelming impression of a busy man. One jam-packed with the commonalities of adulthood: homemaking, career, the works. He’s currently in the middle of uprooting from his home in Hollywood—the one he lived for nearly 10 years—to lay new roots in Pasadena 30 minutes Northeast of LA. In between receiving texts reading “Just finished the kitchen,” or “Hi Kim, just got home. Had to pick up a desk,” I wondered how he’d have time between unpacking his life and the duties of his profession to humor me. Challenged with the task of delving back into his mind some 20 years ago, he resurfaced with the stories that explain the unforeseen past and unexpected experiences of the highly unassuming Mr. Steven Daily. Courtesy Steven Daily As an accomplished fine artist, having done work for the likes of Lucas Films, Disney, HBO, Sony and Darkhorse Comics, Daily has a handsome list of creative accomplishments strewn throughout his repertoire. In the midst of loading and transporting his life in and out of boxes, coordinating knick knacks to be set throughout his home—not to mention simultaneously juggling those never-ending obligations of an artist looking to avoid starvation—he’s knee deep in the consuming task of meticulous event preparation for Marcas Contemporary—the Downtown Santa Ana gallery co-owned by Daily and Costa Mesa’s As Issued owner, Dana Jazayeri—set to formally open its doors in mere days. Jeff Soto, Max242 and Steven; Courtesy Steven Daily As a working artist, Daily knows the task of juggling roles and responsibilities. There are few people willing and prepared to accept 16-hour work days as a normality and acknowledge that getting paid likely entails catching up on sending invoices while on the toilet. I hear it’s a life of wonder, excitement, plenty of pros and no shortage of cons, consistent struggles, satisfying successes—but above all—the option of living life on one's own creative accord. For Daily, it’s a life lived out of sheer carnal creative necessity. “It’s always been about the art.” However, the art that consumed a college-aged Steven Daily doesn’t end with his intrigue of acrylic on canvas. This is the tale of a kid—50 miles east of LA—with a backpack full of aerosol cans, a skateboard, and a bad, bad case of the graffiti bug. RG, Steve, Max242 and Jeff Soto after a day of painting in LA; Courtesy Steven Daily The year was 1991. Nirvana’s Nevermind had just been released while a disinterested Steven Daily sat in his Riverside apartment watching a B-list movie on his tiny black-and-white portable TV. The film was Dreams Never Die, the story of a New York graffiti writer and his harmless albeit drug-peddling love interest as they jointly handle their scandals with the type of plot twists you only receive from solid made-for-TV movies. Somewhere stuffed inside the film’s 100 minutes of ‘80s cult classic bliss, something happened: a fever, a need, a sickness. Something swelled inside Daily and permeated his mind with the need to paint. Not just dabble. Not take a tentative interest in. He wanted to piece: multiple colors, productions on walls, painting heavy and painting hard. Before ever witnessing the flick that ignited his fire, his interest in tagging and graffiti was nurtured several years earlier as a teen skating the streets of Orange County. Born in Riverside, CA, transplanted to south Georgia, then Atlanta, Illinois and eventually back to the OC, Daily got his dose of the teenage experience cruising city streets. “As a skater,” he explains “you end up crossing paths with writers.” The intersections are pretty well documented within the cultures. “Every skate video I’d ever seen to that point had graffiti in it for sure.” Daily found a friend in a young OC writer named Donny. From there, he was exposed to the style, structure and flow of the elite personalized signature, the “tag.” Steven Daily painting during Scribblejam 2002; Courtesy Steven Daily Exhausted from his parent’s gypsy-esque lifestyle, an 18-year-old Daily—fresh out of high school, the fourth he’d attended in his school career—returned to his hometown of Riverside, CA in ’91. He moved into a small apartment off of La Sierra and Vineyard with his tiny monochrome TV, bored and curious, awaiting something to fill the void. “When I saw Dreams Never Die, I just felt like it was the story of a kid struggling with being an artist. That’s the year I started painting.” From here, vital characters were added to his saga, creating his own story of plot twists and a layer of youth drama. “Randy was kind of a hooligan,” he recalls. Stories of a character with a knack for trouble and a passion for testing the limits seeped in over the telephone. Randy sounded like the type of loving lunatic with explosive energy directed at unexpected targets. But most importantly, Randy was the type of hooligan willing to steal Henry Chalfant’s Spray Can Art from Barnes and Noble as a tender gift for a friend. “I looked at that book like it was the Bible.” Pilor character by Steven when he was still writing PR. Character done in LA's Commerce Yard; Courtesy Steven Daily The progression of classic graffiti art flicks soon ensued in Daily’s life: Beat Street, Wild Style, Style Wars, the Holy Trinity if you will. 1991 saw the birth of KUEST, then RSIN, and later GHETO, RUKUS, PR and eventually, STEVEN—a decision made after getting caught writing in Los Angeles’ Commerce Yard in ‘96. “I remember walking out of court after receiving my fine and that being the exact moment I decided to write STEVEN. I’d gone through so many names and been caught writing PR three times and realized I might as well be caught for writing my own name.” Through the closeknit culture of graffiti, Daily’s database of friends expanded. Fellow writers Deph, Max242 and Trek One (known professionally as Jeff Soto) were added to his circle. The team would go on to create the Riverside graffiti crew BASHERS and later boast professional art careers to rival any kid’s living life on the straight and narrow. Glory One, Steven, Unknown writer and Spine in Downtown LA; Courtesy Steven Daily And so the legend of STEVEN began: Riverside to Los Angeles, Long Beach and beyond. The boys got around heavily and in style. “We had high aspirations,” jokes Daily. He recalls these times as vital points to his humble story—memories that would be hard to forget. “I remember the first time I hit a billboard, my first time jumping down from a heaven spot and definitely my first time running across a freeway at 3am to catch a tag on the side of an overpass.” It’s kind of the experience of art unhinged. Many romanticize it—simply fantasizing about creating an alter ego and stamping that identity around the world—but not many can stomach it: the legal woes, the injuries, the narcissism. Courtesy Steven Daily Daily acknowledges the aforementioned cons, but never denies the pros. “Graffiti taught me to be crafty, to be persistent, to be meticulous, to be observant. In some ways, it helped me prepare for the world of fine art.” Two decades later, the unassuming Steven Daily—the one with a list of vandalism, defacement and trespassing charges as long as his repertoire of fine art successes, is opening a gallery in the same community where he learned the art of tagging years before. And while his activity in the streets has without a doubt reduced throughout the years—“The risks are too high” and “I’m too old” being his most prominent justifications—Daily knows the art form never dies due to a need for caution or age. “A graffiti writer never actually stops. He either just slows down a little, or slows down a lot.” Max242 and Steven; Courtesy Steven Daily In that same breath, his “art is art” ethics are heard clear—same emphasis on the action no matter the medium or feats taken to refine the skills. “Even though we painted on walls, we were still painting at home on canvases too. People sometimes get caught up in the destiny and forget the journey. What we’re trying to do [with Marcas Contemporary] is create an ‘artist first’ gallery. Galleries these days have become more about the spectacle whereas Dana and I wanted to create a space that was more like a church; it’s not about the building, but what goes on inside.” The opening reception of “Corrective Course,” a 40 person group show and Marcas Contemporary’s inaugural exhibition, opened on 5th July. —Kimberly B. Johnson Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140703062650-la_4
by Charlotte Jansen

Q&A - Brazilian trio Bicicleta Sem Freio describe themselves as a design and illusration collective, and hail from a small town in the centre of Brazil, but recently they’ve caught the eye of international audiences since their work was selected by Charlotte Dutoit (curator JustKids and Pow Wow Hawaii) and they have branched out into painting walls too – hitting up London’s East London for the first time. Only their second ever mural is now reported to be the largest of its kind in Los Angeles, [source, Upper Playground] and was completed over a tireless ten days. With visual roots pulled from the pyschedelic music scene of the 70s, old comics and posters, it’s their salient use of colour that makes the group’s work stand out, with an added twist of cynical pop. We caught Douglas de Castro, Victor Rocha and Renato Reno while they were on a rare break from traveling, chilling back in Brazil. Have you been following the World Cup? Yes! We’re not addicted to soccer like most people here but the World Cup is always fun. You guys have been touring lately, where are you right now, and where have you been? We’ve been in Lisbon and in London, we’ve made some very fun murals and got together with our friend Vhils. We launched a poster with the guys from Underdogs. That experience was a lot of fun to do and enriched us as artists. Today we’re at our headquarters, in the center of Brazil in a town called Goiania, our homeland. We’re working on some personal projects and making new plans. Estivemos em Lisboa e em Londres, e fizemos murais bem divertidos e nos reunimos com nosso amigo Vhils e lançamos um pôster junto com o pessoal do Underdogs. Foi uma expediência bem divertida e que nos agregou muito como artistas. Atualmente estamos na nossa sede, que fica no centro do Brasil, na cidade chamada Goiânia, nossa terra natal. Estamos trabalhando em alguns projetos pessoais e fazendo novos planos. A lot of Brazilian artists I’ve met find it hard to go beyond Brazil. Do you like to travel? For us, the greatest high about working with murals and art in general is that we can travel and find cultures and countries completely different from ours. I guess for Brazilians is very difficult because of the huge difference in the exchange rates and specially with the bureaucracy that makes impossible to get any support from our government – or even the prejudice of many private companies that think that the impalpable return that art brings is worthless. Para nós o grande barato de trabalhar com murais e arte em geral, é poder viajar e nos deslocarmos para culturas e países completamente diferentes do nosso. Para o Brasileiro é bastante dificil devido a diferença da cotação da moeda e principalmente pela burocracia que impossibilita conseguir qualquer apoio do governo ou pelo preconceito que muitas empresas privadas tem, de achar q o retorno não palpável que a arte traz não tem valor. Mas seguimos felizes fazemos o que gostamos, com muito ou pouco dinheiro para realizarmos, isso não importa, o que importa é concluir cada missão e gravalas também nas nossas memórias, experiência de vida! What are your backgrounds/training? We come from graphic design, but we’ve always been more illustrators than designers per se. I think that design made us lose our fear of going into the world of psychedelic, of the ludic, and to create and look up to things that go way beyond classic art. Nos viemos do design gráfico, mas sempre fomos mais ilustradores do que designers propriamente ditos. Acho q a escola do design nos fez perder o medo de entrar no mundo da psicodelia, do lúdico e cria e admirar coisas que vão bem além do desenho clássico. Main influencers on your style? We’ve always admired many close friends really, and also famous artists. Illustrators like James Jean, João Ruas, Mike Grant, Cooper, R. Crumb, etc. But today we’re very influenced by photography too. Sometimes looking at photographs or real images and this brings us solutions to more original and personal illustrations, rather than getting influenced by another illustration, that is, in itself, a solution that’s already been found. We search for new ways of translating all that, for ourselves. Sempre admiramos muitos amigos próximos mesmo, e artistas famosos também, ilustradores como James Jean, João Ruas, Mike Giant, Cooper, R. Crumb…, mas nos influenciamos , hoje, fortemente pela fotografia também. As vezes nos inspirarmos em fotografias, ou em imagens reais nos traz soluções de ilustrações mais originais e pessoais do que nos influenciarmos por outra ilustração, que por si só, ja é uma solução encontrada. Nós buscamos maneiras novas de traduzir tudo isso, para nós mesmos. What’s your working method? We’re an old school gang, we love some paper and pencil, we draft a lot by hand before getting things rocking. Then we use the brush, ink… If it's in a wall or in the paper the brush was a great marriage to what we are today, it has broadened our horizons. I guess that’s why we don’t use spray paint on our murals. We love colours, especially when they’re disconnected with the real world. Somos ta turma do papel, adoramos um lápis e um papel, esboçamos muito antes de por a mão na massa… Depois vamos para o pincel, tintas, sendo em parede como em papel, o pincel casou muito legal com o que somos hoje, ampliou nossos limites. Acho q por isso que acabamos que não usamos spray nos murais. Adoramos cores, principalmente quando elas não tem ligação alguma com o mundo real. How does it work, day to day, as a collective? Do you work exclusively as a group? We’re always together, but we draw separately. The idea, however, the solutions and discussions always happen so that everyone can enjoy each other’s work and so that it speaks for the group. Sometimes we work for the advertising market too, but it doesn’t matter if it's for a gallery, for the streets, for an outdoor, for a commercial, what gives our high of working is evaluating each case and feeling that it will really be a fun and enriching experience. Nos sempre estamos juntos, mas desenhamos separados. Porém a ideia, as soluções e as discussões sempre acontecem para que todos curtam o trabalho de cada um e que isso fale pelo grupo. As vezes trabalhamos com o mercado publicitário também, não importa se é para um galeria, para as ruas, para um outdor, para um comercial, o que nos da barato de trabalhar é avaliar cada caso e sentir que realmente sera um experiência divertida e engrandecedora. Tell us a bit about your hometown, Goiania? How well known is your work inside Brazil, and how is it to live there compared to elsewhere in Brazil? At our hometown we’re more known for illustrating for the local music and rock scene. Our first jobs were posters for local rock gigs, for rock labels, etc. Our city is the capital of the state of Goias, but is relatively simple and unexpensive like a country town. A lot of people ask us why we don’t move to a bigger city but we love it here and as we travel a lot it's very nice coming back to a peaceful place. Our work in Brazil in general is more well know in the areas of design, advertising and music, because that’s where we’ve started. You recently completed LA’s reportedly largest mural. How did this project come about? The guys from Instagraffity contacted us and invited us to that project through Do Art Foundation. Later we sent them a drawing of our idea for it and they really digged it. It was an incredibly hard job, sometimes we thought we could not do it, but we pushed through it and we still had time to paint a mural on the Do Lab Stage on Coachella, making our dream of coming to Coachella true. Brazil has such a rich heritage in street art and graf, yet you’re described as graphic artists and illustrators, more than street artists. When did you start putting your work onto murals? We’ve always made smaller stuff – except on rare occasions, but we’ve always had friends that did street art and we’ve always admired that line of work and art. Our break came when we were invited by the curator of the Life is Beautiful Festival in Las Vegas, Charlotte Duboit, to paint there. We grabbed that opportunity and liked the experience a lot. Things just developed from there! Where does the name come from (bike without brakes – it’s dangerous by the way, I broke my elbow because of this just now!) Damn, we’re sorry about that! Well, in 2003 we went to a Graphic Design Conference, we were in college at the time, getting to know the design profession. There we got to know a lot of studios like us with fun names, for example, the Buraco de Bala (Bullet Hole) from Brasilia. So we named our studio with this crazy name so that no one would take us seriously (lol). You use colours really nicely – where do the colour combinations come from? In the beginning we were very influenced by the pyschedelic music posters from the Seventies. They had a lot of uncommon colour combinations. We love to try them on our illustrations. Who are your favourite current artists? Any Brazilian artists you can recommend? We were fortunate enough to get to know a great Brazilian illustrator called João Ruas (São Paulo) and we also admire the work of the street artist Mateus Dutra (Goiania) and the tattoo artist and illustrator Gregorio (São Paulo). Also, our great friend the comic book illustrator, Raphael Grampá. We’re fortunate enough of having them as close friends. You also have a music project – can you tell us a little about this, and how you connect this with your visual art? I (Victor) and Douglas have a band called Black Drawing Chalks and we created it about 10 years ago more as a fictitious client we could experiment our illustration on. But how we actually do love playing the band became a real thing and our work got well known in the Brazilian independent rock scene and we ended up spliting our time and life between band and studio. —Charlotte Jansen (All images: Courtesy of the artists) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140702062816-image
by Charlotte Jansen

John Atherton, Hin, BOB MOTOWN at Stour Space
London - From the pleasing alliteration of this trichotomous show at Hackney Wick’s canalside arts space you might surmise the infantile irreverance these artists share for the art world etc and reading the somewhat silly press release you’ll be not much wiser as to what the exhibition is about. Taking animals and absurdity as shared visual motifs, the London-based trio work in illustration and graphic design, but for their first collaboration on an exhibition, the emphasis is on screen prints alongside 3D pieces and originals. Bob Motown; Courtesy of The Artist There will be cats, and also pandas (Hin is originally Chinese) alongside a collaborative print produced by all three artists, released to inaugurate the show, plus artist workshops running up to and during Hackney WickED, the annual community arts festival which takes place across multiple venues in the formerly industrial, virtually pedestrianised and almost gentrified neighbourhood between 1-3rd August 2014. John Atherton; Courtesy of The Artist Thursday’s opening night is part of Time Out and The Whitechapel Gallery’s First Thursdays initiative, with the aim of attracting more people to the free art (booze) of East London’s art venues. Well worth checking out not only for the handmade, humourous details of these playful artists but for the beautiful soaring ceilings of Stour Space with its adjoining Counter Café. Hin, Walk into my life; Courtesy of The Artist Hin, Courtesy of The Artist Collaborative print: Hin, Bob Motown, John Atherton, Courtesy of The Artists —Charlotte Jansen (Image on top: Hin; Courtesy of The Artist) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140702215547-7898075_orig
by Natalie Hegert

Lisbon - This weekend at the auditorium of the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Lisbon, scholars and researchers will convene for the Lisbon Street Art and Urban Creativity Conference. Organized by Daniela V. de Freitas Simões of the Art History Institute/line of Contemporary Art Studies (IHA/CASt) of The Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities – NOVA University of Lisbon, and Pedro Soares Neves of the Artistic Studies Research Centre (CIEBA) of the Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Lisbon and of the CRONO Project of 2010-11, the conference is a juggernaut, with a packed 3-day schedule of papers and keynote speakers. Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Lisbon The conference aims to look at street art and urbanity through a contemporary lens, and the topics are wide-ranging, including such session titles as Semiotics, Visual Arts and Media; City-branding, Economy and Urban Art; and Tactical Urbanism. Some of the paper titles are consumately intriguing: “The thing about walls is they became big murals”: The rise of legal graffiti writing cultures; Stealing from the public: on the removal of street art from the street; Graffiti and New Media: the correlations between the two cultures. While the bulk of the presenters appear to be representing Portuguese institutions, there are a number of international participants. Keynote speakers include curator and writer Cedar Lewisohn, Nuart founder Martyn Reed, and Marcus Willcocks of the UK-based Design Against Crime Research Centre. The full program can be found here. Lisbon street art, by SAM3, part of the CRONO Project. Photo by Bosc d'Anjou. Despite its long history, worldwide ubiquity and impact on visual culture, urban art and street art largely remain understudied in academia. The Urban Creativity Conference is undoubtedly a promising step in the right direction. —Natalie Hegert Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140627175109-bigpicture
by Charlotte Jansen

Larry Clark at Simon Lee
London - Oh London. With your unending ability to hype a party in a shoebox into the event of the summer. If you’ve lived in London for any amount of time, you’ll have to develop a discerning eye for what’s genuinely meritorious of hype, and what’s just flotsam. From today until Saturday, epic photographer and filmmaker Larry Clark, aged 71, is unloading some of his life’s detritus, and will be selling off original photographic prints from his humungous archive of work, out of crate in a fancy London gallery (Simon Lee, at 12 Berkeley Street). Each photograph has a price tag of £100, which is being touted as a decent buy for a little piece of an artist who has defined a decade underground youth culture with indelible films Kids, Bully and Ken Park. The NYC edition of the sale already took place earlier in the year – with coverage from the New York Times ensuring a frenzy. Clark could’ve taken it one step further and done the sale in a backyard, but his motives – making his work affordable to the new generation of young fans, as well as sharing out a very personal collection – will hopefully set a precedent for more artists. It’s not all about the hype. But if queues and crowds make you nervous, avoid. —Charlotte Jansen (All images: Larry Clark, Photograph Sale, installation view; Courtesy of The Artist and Simon Lee Gallery) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140630212648-cropforstreetimg_6106
by Laura Havlin

ROA at StolenSpace Gallery
London - Tapping into the slightly sinister-edged Victorian freak show stalwart, the hall of mirrors, street artist ROA’s installation at Stolenspace Gallery in London’s East End, Projectum 06, is an unsettling experience designed with a surprise around every corner. Salvaged materials, doors, mesh panels, odd displays of found objects and danger signs give the maze-like structure an off-limits feel, as if visitors have had to break into some specially quarantined area to access the space; or, when visiting during a particularly quiet and empty time on a weekday, the effect is that quarantined beasts have broken out leaving the viewer with a sense of unease as to what they might find as they explore. As it happens, they are faced with screaming rabbits and rats multiplied by mirrored panels. ROA wanted to create something the viewer had to completely physically immerse themselves in in order to experience multiple angles, viewpoints and reflections. The animals etched onto the walls, all native to the UK, aggressively bare their teeth, with some renderings revealing skulls and organs. The popular Belgian artist’s aim was to encourage visitors to reassess their relation to wildlife, and with the animals depicted oversized in ROA’s easily identifiable, detailed, black-and-white style dwarfing visitors, and the rat-run configuration of the installation feeling like a human-sized cage, there is a none-too-subtle nod to the fragility of the human being’s standing amongst the beasts of nature, coercing them into a state of vulnerablity. —Laura Havlin (All images: ROA, Exhibition view; Courtesy of the Artist and StolenSpace Gallery) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f
20140529230637-cross_bow_hunter_by_hydeon_2014
by ArtSlant STREET

Ian 'Hydeon' Ferguson at Maxwell Colette Gallery
Chicago - Now on at Maxwell Colette Gallery in Chicago, Ian "Hydeon" Ferguson is showing his fantastical illustrated landscapes, peopled by curious creatures with exaggerated boots called "herms", in a muted palette all his own. They live simple lives, these herms – maybe short for "hermits"? the only other time I'd really heard the word was in reference to the eponymous band from San Francisco, or of course to the classical Greek sculpture form – in small huts, doing small things, like gathering firewood or sleeping. The overall effect, however, isn't small or plain or boring, but still a bit odd, with lots of details left unexplained; for instance, what do all the piles laying about consist of: coal, dirt, chalk? The show runs until July 31st. Maxwell Colette Gallery is proud to present Mass Contemplation, featuring new work from celebrated Chicago-based illustrator Ian “Hydeon” Ferguson. This will be the artist’s first exhibition with the gallery. Ian Ferguson’s work blends street art, fine art, and graphic design into surreal contemporary Americana, full of metaphor, and designed to intrigue and provoke. Reacting to a world he perceives as being “dominated by the exploitation of oversized lifestyles", Ferguson presents images of a minimized existence. It is a world of tiny houses, pointy boots, hobo shacks and mountains populated by fantastic beings called ‘herms’. Ferguson’s vision is steeped in nostalgia and punctuated by a spiritual connection with nature. (text source: Maxwell Colette Gallery) Ian "Hydeon" Ferguson, Tiny House Community, 2014, india ink on paper, 9" x 11"; Courtesy of the artist and Maxwell Colette Gallery More on Ian 'Hydeon' Ferguson: Ian ‘Hydeon’ Ferguson is a Chicago-based visual artist. He makes work about his life experience and is constantly inspired by his environment. Born and raised in California, he received his BS in Graphic Design from AIC-San Diego in 2006. Four years later he moved to Chicago and founded BARO Records. His art has been featured in Hi Fructose Magazine, Op Magazine, Time Out Chicago and numerous other publications. In 2012 Ferguson was selected as a Chicago Cultural Society Featured Artist for Chicago Artists Month. In 2013 he won the RedBull Canvas Cooler competition in Chicago and exhibited work with RedBull Curates at SCOPE in Miami. Most recently his custom shoe design for Converse was released at Nordstrom in March 2014. (text source: Maxwell Colette Gallery) Ian "Hydeon" Ferguson, Halo Loggers, 2014, india ink on paper, 8" x 10"; Courtesy of the artist and Maxwell Colette Gallery Ian "Hydeon" Ferguson, Mass Contemplation Shelter, 2014, india ink on paper, 8" x 10"; Courtesy of the artist and Maxwell Colette Gallery Ian "Hydeon" Ferguson, Oven Dreamer, 2014, india ink on paper, 8" x 10"; Courtesy of the artist and Maxwell Colette Gallery For further information...(ArtSlant Profile) (Image on top: Ian "Hydeon" Ferguson, Cross Bow Hunter, 2014, india ink on paper, 8" x 10"; Courtesy of the artist and Maxwell Colette Gallery) Read-more-graphic-0c90fea6dc5d183f7daca739bdcd0f1f